Are Smartphones Comparable to Compacts & DSLRs – Kevin Carter Takes A Look Via DxOMark

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Kevin Carter our Head of Technical Hardware as well as the Lead Technical Editor for DxOMark and the British Journal of Photography among others, recently pitched the Nokia Lumia 1020 sensor against various DSLR’s and compact cameras to try and decipher whether mobiles really are comparable in terms of image quality.

Kevin says, “recent media reports claim that sales of digital compacts have been hit hard by the increasing popularity of the smartphone, and, as a result, several camera manufacturers have ceased production of low-end models. With their convenience and connectivity along with the emergence of social media sites it’s not difficult to see why a smartphone would be more attractive for certain applications than a purpose-designed compact camera. Mobile phones are so commonplace now that it’s far easier to accept them than a camera in many social situations, or perhaps it’s more accurate to say it’s easier to overlook a smartphone as a camera”.

Read more of this review on the DxOMark site here and we’re sure it will be up on dpreview too quite soon, as they use Kevin’s/DxOMark’s scientific data for their reviews.

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1 thought on “Are Smartphones Comparable to Compacts & DSLRs – Kevin Carter Takes A Look Via DxOMark

  1. Thanks Kevin for the article (and Joanne for the link). It’s interesting to see how close the phones come to traditional P&S cameras and to low entry DSLRs. This article should be really a wake-up call for the big companies like Nikon and Canon. Invest in mobile technology and don’t try to battle a fight you can’t win! Sure the high-end pro DSLRs will survive for some time, but the consumer market camreas get eaten alive by mobile photography. And the most shocking fact for the “old” players is that Apple, Nokia, LG, Samsung and Sony (which has a role like Two-Face in this showdown) don’t officially rival with that market. And … mobile photography is moving fast, very fast …

    Martin

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