Mobile Photography – Streets Ahead – Forty Sixth Edition – Women’s Street Photography Collective

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Welcome to the forty sixth edition of “Streets Ahead,” a weekly column dedicated to women mobile street photographers. Each week we review and curate work that was submitted to our Flickr Group. In addition to creating a showcase video which features a sampling of submitted work, we also highlight a few images that caught our attention… offering some thoughtful commentary about technique, composition, and subject matter.If you are not a member of our Facebook group… we highly recommend that you join us!  This is our space for sharing newsworthy information and conducting discussions (what, when, where, why and how) about Women Photographers/Artists and Street Photography, in general.

So, if you are a woman street photographer, please join our growing community… I’m sure that you will agree that we are a very enthusiastic and supportive group of women!!

• Flickr Group (for weekly showcase submissions)

• Facebook Group (for information sharing/discussions)

Gina Costa has once again commented on this weeks hand-picked images, it’s such a delight to read her expressive and articulate thoughts and Cara Gallardo Weil has put together a phenomenal video showcase, it will leave you breathless – thank you both so much.

Many congratulations to the following artists for being featured this week including:  Donna Donato, Christine Mignon, Dani Salvadori, Michelle Robinson, Nena Tirkkonen, Michaela Meerkatz, Armineh Hovanesian, Stef Le Pape, Susan Rennie, Lee Atwell, Basak Aytek, Kirsten Fenton, Christine Mignon, Laura Peischl, Julia Nathanson, Ile Mont, Robin Sacknoff, Patricia Januszkiewiaz, Jessica Andrews, Lee Atwell, Vanessa Vox, Gina Costa, Fiona Christian, Jormain Cady, Gillian Brodie, Karen Axelrad, Goha Radziszewska and Marzia Bellini.

 

“Connected” by Susan Rennie

Susan has managed to find a perfect point of view to look down on these two sunbathers who are engrossed in their mobile phones, seemingly unaware of each other. Is this a commentary on our current society? These two faceless and anonymous women signify the disassociation of our culture in this barren, vegetation-less environment. A stark and worrisome image and message indeed. Great one Susan.

“Untitled” by Basak Aytek

This image of a woman and her children walking down a rural street immediately caught my eye for two significant reasons. The first of which is the perfect pyramidal compositional arrangement of the figures, which often is the work of a great eye and luck! This compositional arrangement relates to the classic way of disposing figures during the Renaissance and into the 19th Century. The Madonna and Children of the great artists – Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo all used this technique to unify their compositions. Here  Basak has a contemporary “madonna and children”  that speaks to today’s global situation. This image is so strong for its subject, clearly very timely; and the way the figures are tightly, classically arranged, in the immediate foreground of the scene. Very moving photo Basak.

“Picture Me, Picture You” by Ile Mont

This image has nice narrative content as we see the two cultures peering at each other in an anonymous Asian city. The confusion of the background activity does not distract from the center of the action. He and she looking at each other through a “lens”.  Nice Ile!

“The Mirror” by Lee Atwell

Note how Lee uses light and shadow to articulate the space and figure who walks in this mysterious corner in the shadows of Seattle. The spotlight on the arrow pointing right and the little slices of light opening out in the background combine to make this a wonderful, moody image. Brava Lee!

“Split Vision” by Marzia Bellini

Marzia excels in these elegant and reductive scenes which feature beautiful colour and reflected subject matter. This well-composed shot eliminates any excess, as the viewer is captivated by the strong formal elements and brilliant light.

StreetsAhead Flickr Group Showcase

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