Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘To Homer’ by John Keats

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is entitled ‘To Homer’ by John Keats. Keats, who died at the age of twenty-five, had perhaps the most remarkable career of any English poet. He published only fifty-four poems, in three slim volumes and a few magazines. But at each point in his development he took on the challenges of a wide range of poetic forms from the sonnet, to the Spenserian romance, to the Miltonic epic, defining anew their possibilities with his own distinctive fusion of earnest energy, control of conflicting perspectives and forces, poetic self-consciousness, and, occasionally, dry ironic wit. In the case of the English ode he brought its form, in the five great odes of 1819, to its most perfect definition.

Source: Poetry Foundation

I have matched @rhkingphoto – Robert H King’s image ‘The Houdini Mechanism’ (In Memory of Mr David Bowie), with this poem. Robert H. King is a visually impaired photographer and uses Photography and Mobile Art to document and recreate his world and lost memories with an iPhone as his optical lens.www.seeingtheunseen.net

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Blue Tattoo’

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is entitled ‘Blue Tattoo’ by John Richard Reed. I have matched @booksandshit – Michel Pretterklieber’s image ‘Smokings 001/666’ with this poem. You can view and follow him here on Instagram.

Source: Poetry Foundation

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisper

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Old Love and New’

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is entitled ‘Old Love and New’ by Sara Teasdale. Teesdale received public admiration for her well-crafted lyrical poetry which centered on a woman’s changing perspectives on beauty, love, and death. Many of Teasdale’s poems chart developments in her own life, from her experiences as a sheltered young woman in St. Louis, to those as a successful yet increasingly uneasy writer in New York City, to a depressed and disillusioned person who would commit suicide in 1933. Although many later critics would not consider Teasdale a major poet, she was popular in her lifetime with both the public and critics. She won the first Columbia Poetry Prize in 1918, a prize that would later be renamed the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry.

Source: Poetry Foundation

I have matched @time.and.again – Amanda Parker’s image ‘Rainy Day’ with this poem. You can view and follow her here on Instagram.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisper

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘To See The Glass Half Full (note to self)’

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is entitled ‘To See The Glass Half Full (note to self)’ and is by Doris Culverhouse. It is so important that we cultivate and focus of optimism and the good in life and at times, we all have difficulties with this. To my mind, when we lose our footing, as long as we default back to see the glass half full, then all will be well, we have make it so.

Source: PoetrySoup

I have matched @tootz – Suza’s – image ‘Gerbera quietly going to seed’ with this poem. You can view and follow her here on Instagram.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisper

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Tremble’ by Major Jackson with Roger Guetta

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is entitled ‘Tremble’ and is by Major Jackson. “Major Jackson’s books of poems are Holding Company (2010, Norton) and Hoops (2006, Norton), both finalists for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literature-Poetry, and Leaving Saturn (2002, University of Georgia Press), which was awarded the Cave Canem Poetry Prize for a first book of poems and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in poetry. He is a recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award and has been honored by the Pew Fellowship in the Arts and the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress.

Jackson is the Richard Dennis Green and Gold Professor at University of Vermont and a core faculty member of the Bennington Writing Seminars. In 2006-07, he was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University”. – Source: Poetry Foundation.

I have matched @draman – Roger Guetta’s image ‘Ontological – Hysterical Mind Theatre’ with this poem. You can view and follow him here on Instagram.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Nobody Told Me’

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is in some ways a dedication to the poet Hollie McNish. Essentially, when she became pregnant, she didn’t feel she was ready to be a mother, actually she felt ashamed and channelled her feelings, of parenthood, into verse. McNish’s poetry is not all about love and joy, it’s about pregnancy worries and traumas to all the concerns and pressures we feel post pregnancy too. With public breastfeeding in toilets, to trying to quieten down her baby whilst commuting to work on the train. With my own daughter now at thirteen years old, these type of issues are behind us and I am so enjoying sharing our time together, being together.

I took this mobile photograph of Bella as we spent the day at a beautiful English country estate.

Here is an excerpt of Hollie McNish’s book – ‘Nobody Told Me’ – a book you might want to read if you really do need to know the in’s and out’s of it all… (I am grateful those days have passed).

To view the others we have published in this series, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – “Hope’ ‘is the thing with Feathers’

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is a poem entitled “Hope” ‘is the thing with feathers’ by one of America’s greatest and most original poets of all time, Emily Dickinson.

“As with many of her poems, Emily Dickinson takes an abstract feeling or idea – in this case, hope – and likens it to something physical, visible, and tangible – here, a singing bird. Hope, for Dickinson, sings its wordless tune and never stops singing it: nothing can faze it. In other words (as it were), hope does not communicate by ‘speaking’ to us in a conventional sense: it is a feeling that we get, not always a rational one, that cheers us even in dark times of despair. Indeed, hope is sweetest of all when the ‘Gale’ is busy raging: during turbulent or troubled times, hope is there for us. And hope can withstand just about anything: even in times of cold comfort (‘the chillest land’) or in foreign or unfamiliar climes (‘on the strangest Sea’), hope remains. And hope never asks for anything from us in return. It provides comfort and solace but does not require anything back”. source: InterestingLiterature

Today, I am matching the mobile artwork by @tankaqueen – Alexis Rotella to this poem. You can follow her on Instagram here @tankaqueen

To view the others we have published in this series, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – Scottish Poet Robert Montgomery

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Robert Montgomery’s poetry has become so ‘in vogue’ that some people are adorning their bodies with tattoos of it. (see below). Montgomery’s work reaches a wide audience because he shares it from advertising billboards and the like. He has also been involved with the ‘Pay with a Poem’ campaign, which allows customers in poetry cafes to exchange poetry for coffee across the world. The aim is that Montgomery will collect these poems and create an installation in a secret location.

It’s a very cool and a very interesting concept. I am all for reaching new audiences, whether we are discussing poetry or photography and art. Of course, I like to marry the two and this is the purpose of our Saturday Poetry column. I select one poem a week and marry it with an image that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer.

Today, I am matching the mobile artwork by Louise Whiting to the poem by Montgomery below and as featured on this young fan via Tumblr. You can follow Whiting on Instagram here @louisewhiting.

If you would like to view the other poems we have published in this series, please go here.

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – In a Garden by Amy Lowell

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An oft-quoted remark attributed to poet Amy Lowell applies to both her determined personality and her sense of humor: “God made me a business woman,” Lowell is reported to have quipped, “and I made myself a poet.” During a career that spanned just over a dozen years, she wrote and published over 650 poems, yet scholars cite Lowell’s tireless efforts to awaken American readers to contemporary trends in poetry as her more influential contribution to literary history. “Poet, propagandist, lecturer, translator, biographer, critic . . . her verve is almost as remarkable as her verse,” opined poet Louis Untermeyer in his 1923 work American Poetry since 1900. A collection of Lowell’s work, published posthumously as What’s O’Clock?, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926“, The Poetry Foundation.

I have matched @anamagalhaes01 – Ana Magalhaes image mobile photograph with this poem ‘In a Garden’ by Amy Lowell. You can follow her on Instagram here.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

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Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – Sentenced to Life – Clive James

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I am a huge fan of Clive James, he made his name as a television critic, essayist and wit but he started as a poet and five years ago he was diagnosed with leukaemia, emphysema and kidney failure – he describes it as ‘the lot’ and he is ending as a poet.

There’s a particular story I remember reading about James, it goes like this…

One time he was going through a creative dry spell. He had written a play for the London stage and it bombed spectacularly. Not only did it ruin his family financially but it also cost him some dear friends. He fell into the deepest depression and shame. When the play closed, all he could do was sit on the sofa in his lounge and stare at the wall, mortified and humiliated. His wife held the family together, somehow. He did not feel he could ever write again.  He stayed under this spell for a very long time. One day though, his young daughters interrupted his grieving process. They asked him if he could make their old scruffy secondhand bicycles look nicer. James obeyed, in a dutiful but not joyous manner. He carefully painted the girls bicycles in bright shades of red, frosted the wheel spokes with silver and when the paint dried he added tiny silver and gold stars all over the bicycles. ‘A field of exquisitely detailed constellations’. James couldn’t stop painting stars, the girls wanted their bicycles back and grew impatient. When at last he handed the bicycles back to the girls, they pedalled off up the road, on their magical ‘new’ bikes, completely thrilled and excited. The next day, his daughters brought home a little girl from school, who asked if he would paint stars on her bicycle. He did it. When that was done, another little girl turned up and soon there was a whole queue of little girls wanting him to paint stars on their bicycles.

James, one of the worlds greatest writers, spent weeks painting thousands of stars on little girls bicycles in his garage and as he did so, he began to recover. He realised that he really did want to keep on creating things and as he did so, he was healing, something was coming back to life within him. He thought, ‘I will write about this someday’, when he thought this he realised he was free and the creator had returned.

Source: Clive James Poetry

This week, I wanted to share this poem by James entitled ‘Sentenced to Life’. I have matched @CatMorris – Cat Morris’s image of mobile photography with this poem. You can follow her on Instagram here.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

Read moreMobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – Sentenced to Life – Clive James