Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘A Childhood’ by Robin Robertson

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is a poem entitled ‘A Childhood’ by Robin Robertson.  I hope you enjoy this poem, I have matched centerforbalancecliff with this image.

Source: The New Yorker

 To view the others in our Mobile Photography/Art Saturday Poetry section, please go here.

To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

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Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Autobiography In Five Short Chapters’ by Portia Nelson

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is a poem entitled ‘Autobiography In Five Short Chapters’ by Portia Nelson. In many ways this is an uplifting poem, Portia Nelson’s delightful and insightful story of the hole in the sidewalk/path provides a metaphor of life. Life is like a stroll down a somewhat hazardous sidewalk/path. The story identifies the key feature required to safely navigate life’s sidewalk/path.

Source: Portia Nelson from the book There’s A Hole in My Sidewalk

This is a deep thinking poem, think which verse you may be on.  I hope you enjoy this poem, I have matched g_wah – Graeme Roy’s image with this.

 

I

I walk, down the street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I fall in

I am lost…. I am helpless

It isn’t my fault.

It takes forever to find a way out.

 

II

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I pretend I don’t see it.

I fall in again

I can’t believe I am in the same place but, it isn’t my fault.

It still takes a long time to get out.

 

III

I walk down the same street

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I see it there.’

I still fall in…. it’s a habit, my eyes are open.

I know where I am.

It is my fault.

I get out immediately.

 

IV

I walk down the same street.

There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

I walk around it.

 

V

I walk down another street.

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Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Ample Make This Bed’ by Emily Dickinson

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is a poem entitled ‘Ample Make This Bed’ by Emily Dickinson. This poem, it is said has two meanings, one that the poet is speaking about a sensual moment that she is intending to spend with her companion, or fantasising about it and the other notion, is that she is preparing her deathbed. In as much as she is trying to ensure that when the time comes, everything is perfect.

Source: Poem Hunter

For me, I align myself with the former, not least because several weeks ago, Kevin and I ordered a new bed and we are very excited about it being delivered next Tuesday. It has been handmade and is the most luxurious bed you can buy in England. It’s vast, far larger than our current bed and we have purchased the most delicious very high thread count new sheets. So, Christmas for us, will be spent in this entire location (we hope).

I hope you enjoy this poem, I have matched Trishg61’s ‘What you don’t know, you don’t miss’ image with this poetry. The poet has used the punctuation marks for channelizing the flow of the poem. Dickinson has also broken the sentences in such a way, that the readers would understand the flow of the expressions better. The poet has stopped at points, where she wanted to capture a frame of expression.

Ample make this bed.

Make this bed with awe;

In it wait till judgment break

Excellent and fair.

Be its mattress straight,

Be its pillow round;

Let no sunrise’ yellow noise

Interrupt this ground”.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

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Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Silt Whisper’ by Ailbhe Darcy

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

This week’s poem, Silt Whisper is by Ailbhe Darcy, it is from her book Imaginary Menagerie.

“One-Eyed Jack is an American board game, played with cards and poker chips It’s the two-eyed Jacks (clubs or diamonds) that are the official wild cards. Silt Whisper begins with a signal that breaking and making rules could be significant in the poem. Hearts and spades are the official one-eyed jacks, and we all know what they symbolise. If it’s a couple playing the game, the invention of their own rules would be a shared joke, and mark a developing intimacy”. 

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

 

Silt Whisper

 

That summer one-eyed jacks were wild:

we learned new rules, left tea to brew.

Smoke stilled air. Leaves lay unturned.

Unemployment was another high.

I had been a storm in a polystyrene cup,

seeking scald, steam, instance, but now

We drew up lists; mapped out desire lines; skipped

interviews to collect blooms; paused before flight.

The only record of that time the silt of prophecy,

the memory of weight in our cupped hands.

For a short while we held the one breath:

I could never set it down.

Read moreMobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Silt Whisper’ by Ailbhe Darcy

Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Paris Is A Party’ – Ernest Hemmingway

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

Today, I am publishing a slight twist on our traditional Saturday Poetry section. “One of the most popular books in France this week is a classic: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway. Its title in French is Paris est une fete — or “Paris is a party.” The book is finding new readers — and it’s also being left as a tribute to those who lost their lives one week ago.

The Hemingway memoir, published posthumously in 1964, is being celebrated for what it, in turn, celebrates: Paris as an exciting place of ideas, a nexus of people who love life and the arts. The book is set in the 1920s, as Paris recovered from the oppressions of World War I” reported NPR.

Saying that copies of the book “have been flying off bookshop shelves,” Agence France Presse reports, “Paperback versions are being deposited, along with flowers and candles, in front of bullet-ridden windows at one of the Paris bars targeted by the jihadist gunmen.”

Copies are also turning up outside the Bataclan concert hall, where a rock show became the scene of the worst carnage in the attacks that officials say killed 130 people and wounded more than 350.

On France’s Amazon website, the book shot to No. 1 after re-entering its list of the Top 100 titles just four days ago.

The book includes Hemingway’s famous line, “If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.”

The spike in demand means that the book’s French publisher, folio, has received more orders for the book in the past week than the 8,000 it might get in a strong year for the title, according to The Guardian.

Report from NPR

If you would like to order your own copy of this incredible book, please go here.

I have matched @ic_streetlife’s (candidcameraman) image with this book. You can follow him on Instagram here

 

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Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Bat’ by Lewis Carroll

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

Today, I am publishing ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Bat’ by Lewis Carroll. It is a poem recited by the Mad Hatter in chapter seven of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865). It is a parody of “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”.

The poem seems to question the activities of a bat which appears to be a mysterious and even a mystical creature whose daily on goings are a mystery to the speaker. Though the bat does not appear to have any structural affinity with a tea tray it has been compared to one.

The poem seems to question the activities of a bat which appears to be a mysterious and even a mystical creature whose daily on goings are a mystery to the speaker. Though the bat does not appear to have any structural affinity with a tea tray it has been compared to one.

The theme of the poem is simply a musing on the activity and ontology of a bat but we could also suggest that this appears to be a nonsense poem and the theme is only the manifestation of this nonsense.

Apparently the tone of the poem is that of surprise or amusement at the antics of the bat but being informed of the real purport of the book of Caroll we could not simply stop at the conclusion that the poem is a piece of nonsense. The style is simple enough to be of enjoyment to little children who were the primary target audience of the book. But as is suggested earlier the simplicity could be very deceptive and may be pregnant with many hidden agendas. The fact that it is a parody of a popular rhyme – Twinkle, Twinkle little Star makes it both blameless and guilty of subversion of the popular standards of the time. In fact the book is a parody of the manners and times of Victorian England. It is curious that the word ‘Twinkle’ is not an onomatopoeic word as it appears to be since the word does not represent the sound of the object. The sound of the star is actually not heard by human ears (it is registered by highly sophisticated radio machinery if the star happens to be a pulsar!). The word is actually a visual onomatopoeia (if there could be an expression like that!) where the blinking of the stars has been popularly rendered as ‘twinkle’.

Caroll has been criticising the absurdity of the linguistic over-decorativeness in both literature and everyday use and just by using a word in as absurd a use as it was always used he might be satirizing the entire traditionness of the linguistic practices of English as a language. This feature of the poem is more remarkable when we bring into attention the fact that the poem is basically a parody. A parody is a work which generally makes fun of some other work of authority and reputation by disgruntling and twisting its features by the means of exaggeration or minimalization. Here Caroll takes on a popular icon of a nursery rhyme to twist its absurdity out into the open. The parody is reinforced by the absurdity of the structural comparison of the bat and the tray. It appears that it was done primarily to make the rhyme but the absurdity and ‘no-rhyme-no-reason’ actually heightens the element of parody. Bats are actually shy creatures and mysterious. The speaker is clueless about the bat and not so much as the child in the original rhyme. After all the rhyme is recited by the Mad Hatter who is, well, mad! Thus the character is in rhyme with what he says and therefore the rhyme is after all not so nonsensical.

(This wonderful analysis was provided by Beamingnotes.com – really fabulous website).

I have matched @lettsflair image ‘Moonlit Skieswith this poem. You can follow her on Instagram here

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

Read moreMobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Bat’ by Lewis Carroll

Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘I Believe’ by Brucellish K Sangma’

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

Today, I am publishing ‘I Believe’ by Brucellish K Sangma. I Believe is a poem by a Garo poet, Brucellish K Sangma. It is a translation from the original Garo poem, Anga Bebera’a into English by the same poet. She is one of the eminent poets among the Garo women poets. She often translates her own poems from one language to another.

THEMES:

Capabilities of Human Beings:

The poem I Believe depicts the theme of the uncountable capabilities of man and his dreams and achievements. The poet believes a human being can rise to great heights, endure a number of hurdles and reach their goal. In the first stanza, the poet says that a human being can throw a pebble upwards, pierce through the heaven and watch the angels play. This actually means that humans can achieve the most difficult and sometimes even the unachievable goals. At a spiritual level, it means raising our conscience to a higher point and becoming one with God.

In fact, the poet wants to say that human beings can conquer all parts of the universe if they believe in themselves, use their capabilities and work diligently. She means to say that humans can conquer all the three realms of the earth- the atmosphere, the lithosphere and the hydrosphere. The poet also believes that humans can make this world heaven-like and themselves like angels.

Feminist Reading:

The poem I Believe has been written by one of the eminent Garo poets and activists, Brucellish K Sangma. The poem voices the concern about dreams and aspirations of a woman in a male-dominated society. A number of restrictions are imposed on women in a patriarchal society. Such a society is male-centred and they subordinate women in all domains in their life: familial, religious, political and economical. The woman of today wants to free herself from such a society and achieve her dreams. She wants to reach the sky, dive into deep oceans, and conquer all the three realms of the earth. The poet believes today’s women like the poet can achieve her goals.

STYLE:

Simplicity rules the poems of Brucellish K Sangma. It is a translation from the original Garo poem, Anga Bebera’a into English by the same poet. The poem consists of six stanzas and the poet has taken ample care to use appropriate English words to convey her theme and message. The poem is composed in free verse i.e. it has no rhyme scheme and no regular pattern of rhythm. It should be noted that each stanza is a single sentence.

ANAPHORA:

Anaphora is a figure of speech in which there is deliberate repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of verses, paragraphs, clauses or sentences. Anaphora is frequently used in Bible and in poetry strongly influenced by Bible. In this poem I Believe, ‘I believe’ has been used repeatedly in the beginning of each stanza (except stanza 6) to convey the feelings, dreams and aspirations of the poet.

HAIKU:

A Haiku is a traditional poetic form , which originated in Japan. It is three-line poem with a total of 17 syllables. This poem I Believe consists of six stanzas, each comprising of three lines. The different stanzas are put together through the central theme which runs throughout the poem. It is for this reason that the poem resembles the Japanese Haiku.

CUMULATIVE LISTING:

I Believe has used the technique of Cumulative Listing. It is technique which involves a kind of accumulation of broadly similar ideas. The device is used to emphasize the main idea of a poem.

Each stanza begins with the phrase ‘I believe’ and enlists a number of things that the speaker is capable of doing. Thus, the ideas, if put together can be seen forming a list or catalogue.

SYMBOLISM:

Symbolism refers to the use of symbols to represent ideas and qualities. The entire poem, I Believe, though written in simple and lucid words, has symbolic meaning.

Some of the symbolism are listed below:

“I believe I can soar heights

Touch the silky clouds

And feel the stars” (Stanza 2): Here, heights symbolize ‘sky’ meaning space without limit. ‘stars’ symbolize the list of achievers.

“I believe I can dive

Right into the depths

And swim with the sharks” (Stanza 3): Here, ‘depths’ symbolize the ‘ocean of life’ and ‘sharks’ symbolize the hurdles and difficulties faced in life. The poet believes she can cross all hurdles that come on her way and achieve success.

“I believe I can claw into the earth’s belly

Pick up the priceless gems

And adorn myself with them” (Stanza 4): ‘claw into the earth’s belly’ symbolize putting in labour and hard work to achieve something. ‘Priceless gems’ symbolize the resources available on earth- metals, minerals and precious stones. ‘Adorn’ means to enrich oneself with this resources.

 

(This wonderful analysis was provided by Beamingnotes.com – really fabulous website).

I have matched @angie.lambert – Angie Lambert’s imageConsiderations with this poem. You can follow her on Instagram here

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

Read moreMobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘I Believe’ by Brucellish K Sangma’

Mobile Photography – Saturday Poetry – ‘They Flew From Me’ by Sir Thomas Wyatt

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

Today, I am publising ‘They Flew From Me’ by Sir Thomas Wyatt. The story of love’s betrayal is obliquely told, charged with pain, yet it speaks straight to us across 500 years. There is a mystery here too. Is Anne Boleyn the woman in the loose gown, who catches the poet in her arms “long and small”? Thomas Wyatt was imprisoned in the Tower for alleged adultery with her, and it is thought that from his window he witnessed her execution. The poem is written in rhyme royal, which may be a clue in itself …

Source: The Poetry Foundation

I have matched @angie.lambert – Angie Lambert’s image with this poem. You can follow her on Instagram here

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

 

 

Read moreMobile Photography – Saturday Poetry – ‘They Flew From Me’ by Sir Thomas Wyatt

Mobile Photography – Saturday Poetry -‘ I Dwell in Possibility’ by Emily Dickinson

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

Today, I am publising ‘I Dwell in Possibility’ by Emily Dickinson. Much has been written about this poem, esseintally it means that the opportunties she has in life are endless. It is an optimistic poem about what she can dream and accomplish.

Source: The Poetry Foundation

I have matched @shelserkin – Sheldon Serkin’s image ‘Primrose‘ with this poem. You can follow him on Instagram here

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

Read moreMobile Photography – Saturday Poetry -‘ I Dwell in Possibility’ by Emily Dickinson

Mobile Photography – Saturday Poetry – ‘Dream Song 100’ by John Berryman

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

Today, I am publising “Dream Song 100″ by John Berryman, he would have been 101 this year, had he lived. One of the things most people know about him is that he did not. He killed himself at 57 – after a lifetime of chaos, alcoholism, mental illness and extremely hard work.  Have you watched someone dying from alcoholism? I can’t express how hard it is...

Berryman’s only novel was about an alcoholic drying out. It was called Recovery, and it wasn’t finished because he didn’t. On 7 January 1977 Berryman walked along the outside of the covered Washington Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis, climbed on the railing, leaned out and let go. Some accounts had it that he made a gesture something like waving goodbye.

Source: FamousPoetsandPoems.com

I have matched @trishg61 – Patricia Geyer’s image “Silence of the Lambs…” with this poem. You can follow her on Instagram here and you can learn more about her work here.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

Read moreMobile Photography – Saturday Poetry – ‘Dream Song 100’ by John Berryman

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