‘Brought to Light’ – Mobile Photography / Art Interview with Clint Cline from Florida, USA

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Our ‘Brought to Light‘ interview section explores the mobile photographers and mobile artists behind their art. Each question has been carefully crafted and is designed to allow us to get to know them a little more intimately. To view others … Read more

‘One Day Odyssey’ Mobile Photography & Art Challenge with Liliana Schwitter from Switzerland

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On 30th May 2017, we launched a new Challenge, relevant to all genres of mobile photography and art. A Challenge like no other, as our main requirement is for you to spend at least seven hours, taking or creating mobile … Read more

Mobile Photography and Art – A Picture’s Worth with Tricia Dewey from Texas, US

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A Picture’s Worth‘… is where we ask mobile photographers that have created powerful mobile photography/art to explain the processes they took. This includes their initial thoughts as to what they wanted to create, why they wanted to create it, how they created it, including all apps used and what they wanted to convey. We also ask these incredible artists to explain their emotions and how the image projects those feelings. We have published a few A Picture’s Worth articles recently, if you have missed those – please go here.

In this ‘A Picture’s Worth’ today we asked Tricia Dewey to tell us more about her image featured here.  Dewey has detailed her thoughts below, we think you’ll find this invaluable…

 

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Mobile Photography / Art – Three Years of Tutorials: A Recap, an Assembly Feature, and an iColorama Procedural

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Huge thanks to Jerry Jobe on his Mobile Photography / Art Tutorial Third Year Writing Anniversary. We have loved and enjoyed every single one of Jobe’s tutorials and we know that you do too.  This week, Jobe does something a little different, take a look…(foreword by Joanne Carter).

“On November 7, 2012, I published my first tutorial on Hipstamatic. As usual, on my anniversary, I like to take a look back. But there’s more to this article than a walk down memory lane. There’s a feature currently in beta for Assembly that I’d like to show you, and an iColorama procedural on how to create a multicolored water color painting like this one. So let’s get started!”

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Mobile Photography Tutorial – The Value of Layers, featuring Leonardo – Photo Editor

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We are delighted to publish Jerry Jobe’s latest mobile photography/art tutorial for our reading and viewing pleasure. This week Jobe takes a look at the comprehensive mobile photography app, Leonardo. Read his thoughts as he puts it through its paces (foreword by Joanne Carter).

Leonardo retails for $4.99/£3.99 and you can download it here.

The current explosion of mobile art and photography has introduced multitudes to digital techniques of manipulating images. Many, if not most of them, have no experience with the behemoth of desktop image editors, Photoshop. There’s certainly nothing wrong with that. Those of us that have, though, realize that there is an enormous value in using layered files to create art. I’m going to introduce some concepts of layering through the use of Leonardo, a brilliant photo editor with hundreds of features.

Layers can be thought of as stacks of glass, with the viewer looking down through them. The bottom glass contains the base image, and each glass on top of that covers part of the composite image below. Each glass has pixels either on part of the glass (with the remainder of the glass being transparent), or covering the entire glass, but being partially transparent in some way. The advantage of layers is that you can go back and adjust each piece of glass: move it around, adjust how clear it is, paint more pixels on it. If you want to add a green tint to a scene, but don’t want it to affect the butterfly you added to the scene, then you move the green tinted glass below the butterfly glass.

Layering is possible in a few apps, like Pixelmator and Laminar. My favorite layering app is Leonardo, by Pankaj Goswami, the creator of Superimpose. It’s a universal app, working on both the iPhone and iPad, and is worth the (relatively) hefty price of $4.99. Like Superimpose, Leonardo has no splash screen, so here’s the app’s icon, blown up ridiculously large.

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APPquestion: If you could use only one app, which would you choose?

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We are delighted to publish this wonderful article by our APPart Editor Bobbi McMurry, it relates to a question she raised within our Facebook Group for this column. We are sure you will find this incredibly informative.  Over to you Bobbi (foreword by Joanne Carter).

“A few weeks ago we had a lively discussion (within our specific Facebook group for this Column – see here), about the one art app we couldn’t live without. There were 155 posts in this talk that not only named specific apps, but also touched on the aspects we like about our go-to apps.

I have created a summary highlighting the items mentioned in our APPart conversation. Please note, this summary in no way attempts to cover the vast array of features contained in these very robust apps”.

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Mobile Photography – A Picture’s Worth with Caroline MacMoran – TheAppWhisperer

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A Picture’s Worth‘… is where we ask mobile photographers that have created powerful mobile photography/art to explain the processes they took. This includes their initial thoughts as to what they wanted to create, why they wanted to create it, how they created it, including all apps used and what they wanted to convey. We also ask these incredible artists to explain their emotions and how the image projects those feelings. We have published a few A Picture’s Worth articles recently, if you have missed those – please go here.

In this A Picture’s Worth today we asked Caroline MacMoran to tell us more about her wonderful image ‘Caught in Between’. Caroline has explained eloquently all we wanted to know. We think you will enjoy this very much.

If you would like to contribute to this section or if you have seen an image that you would like to learn more about, just email Joanne@theappwhisperer.com and we will get it all set up). Foreword by Joanne Carter (over to you Caroline).

 

“Having just returned from a workshop in San Miguel de Allende, led by the immensely talented and creative Karen Divine, I was feeling out-of-sorts. Somewhat anxious, somewhat excited, and full of the need and desire to create, I just started working. While in Mexico, Karen suggested to try and create composite images that only included shots from our time there so I wanted to continue with this challenge. This image, Caught in Between, is a composite of three basic images shot during the workshop–not including the background/texture.

We were fortunate enough to have two afternoons of model shoots in incredible locations, and the arms and head, as well as the feet, are from two models during these shoots. The red dress was from my first day in San Miguel, before the workshop started, as we walked through the city and the markets.

Occasionally I’ll have a specific idea that I want to try and bring into being, but more often than not I start working with no real plan. This was the case with Caught in Between. I started placing images on my background, with one quiet whisper in my head; “keep it minimal”. This was unusual for me, as I often end up with many images and parts in a composite piece because I like the way the pieces interact and blend. Trying to understand this thought in hindsight, it made sense given my feeling state.

I had arrived home from San Miguel feeling so alive from the recent opportunity of a week devoted to pure creating, friendships, time alone, and travel to a beautiful town full of visual treats. Quickly, however, I fell into the hole of laundry, food shopping, work, and house chores. I longed to be back in a place where I could feel that sense of creative freedom, but felt caught between that longing and my place of comfort–my family and my home. I needed to just focus on pure images, simple creations that could slow me down and help me feel grounded in the place I am now. But I also wanted my place now to include more of what I experienced while away.

Caught in Between, though unaware of this representation as I composed it, is an image which speaks to my various longings. The red dress straight ahead, the arms and head thrown back in a dance, and the feet firmly planted (though tilting forward) are my way of understanding, of attempting to bring me back to a place of home, and to a new challenge. 

Thanks to Joanne for her interest in my work and for inviting me to express my thoughts. The image, Caught in Between, was created with Hipstamatic, ProCamera, Leonardo and Snapseed.

To contact Caroline via Facebook, please go here

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iOS Photography Tutorial – ‘Tune in and Drop out: Eliminating a plain black or white background’ by Jerry Jobe

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We’re delighted to publish Jerry Jobe’s latest technical tutorial here today.  This week Jerry explains the intricacies of creating composites with your iOS photo editing device, don’t miss this…(foreword by Joanne Carter). “Sooner or later, we all want to create … Read more

Mobile Photography Interview – A Day In The Life Of Giulia Baita – A Beautiful and Very Talented Photographer

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Welcome to our very exciting interview column on theappwhisperer.com. This section entitled “A Day in the Life of…” is where we take a look at some hugely influential, interesting and accomplished individuals in the mobile photography and art world… people … Read more

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