The Recipe I Can’t Live Without with Rita Colantonio from the United States

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We have a new section at TheAppWhisperer.com and it’s called The Recipe I Can’t Live Without’, within that we are asking highly successful mobile artists to give us their one recipe (tutorial) they can’t live without in relation to editing their images. Kicking us off today, is Rita Colantonio from the United States. She has created a very tantalising appropriation family recipe . To read the others in this new series, please go here. (foreword by Joanne Carter)

Read moreThe Recipe I Can’t Live Without with Rita Colantonio from the United States

Assignment – Reflection – Result and First Essay with Rita Colantonio for our Upcoming Book ‘Away with Words’

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As the first chapter of our new book ‘Away with Words’ begins to take shape, Rita Colantonio’s work is the perfect conceptual starting point for our series of twelve 1000 word essays personally written by myself. This non fiction work merges discursive scholarship with what may be construed as personal flights of fancy. That’s not to say it will disappoint, moreover I have given myself a far and wide range to delve into photography, literature, art, theory, design and music as I tease out my own offbeat associations and at the same time astutely tune into each mobile photographers key tropes and artfully deconstruct their imagery. I thus begin…

What are we looking at?  We are looking at a street photograph or perhaps it could be referred to as ‘candid’ or a ‘social documentary photograph’ as this genre includes people in a public place. We are looking at Colantonio’s image of  two young ostensibly anonymous opposing sex adults, sitting side by side a canal in Venice. The weather appears ambient, the trees are in full leaf. Colourful bed laundry has been strung out to dry adjacent to an apartment window. It is not summer but perhaps spring time as the couple in the foreground are wearing jackets, to seemingly prevent a chill. There is the feeling of intimacy between the two adults as well as monumentality, in the expression of the depths of ordinary life. There may be glare from the reflection of the canal, both adults wear sunglasses to shield their eyes. The female rests her head on her left hand and in turn her elbow rests upon her left knee. Her right arm is drawn across her waist. Her legs are naked and closed together at the knees, with her feet and her lower legs wide apart. She wears green ankle boots. Her red handbag is adjacent to her left side and it is open. It looks as if there is a bottle of still water peeping out, perhaps she has just shared a drink. Her long brunette hair is parted at the centre and falls loosely over her shoulders. The male with shoulder length blond hair and slight beard, touches the shin of his left leg, it is bent at the knee and faces the female, his right leg is more upright but also bent at the knee. He wears green cropped trousers with colourful red and blue laced trainers. He wears a large watch on his right wrist and the sunlight catches the face.

How can this image be interpreted? The young adults are not talking, they appear to be in deep thought. The female’s cocked head looks ponderous. We don’t know whether she is pondering doubts or pondering something bigger. The male may be forlorn or he may not. We can create a distinction between identity and imaging. It looks like something, but we don’t actually know. This photograph challenges our perceptions, perhaps they need to make an important decision but equally are we ready to accept the reality of other concepts?

One of my favourite books and I have plenty is entitled ‘Flaneuse’ by Lauren Elkin. From the French verb ‘flaner’, the ‘flaneur’. or ‘the one who wanders aimlessly’. There’s a chapter within this book entitled ‘Venice – Obedience’ and within this she discusses another good read, ‘The Comfort of Strangers’ by Ian McEwan. This book is set in Venice and it is not your typical Venetian romance, if anything, it is seedy but to Elkin she felt that reading McEwan’s book, ‘loosened something in her mind, or maybe planted something’. She was unsure of exactly what it was but it left her with the determination to write about Venice and as she describes later, she had recognised Venice as a ‘shadowy double for Paris’ and I could not agree more. Having arrived in Venice via a splashing vaporetto two summers ago, I recognise both viewpoints and most of all, in this instance of Rita Colantonio’s imagery. Colantonio has a painterly eye for colour and composition and it is palpable in this colour photograph. There is a deep attentiveness that speaks of her disinterest in anything other than making the seemingly mundane world outside of this image seem luminously beautiful. I conjure the fantasy that this young couple are students of art history specialising in the early Renaissance. They appear unaware or at least, indifferent that Colantonio is taking their photograph. A photographs context is a powerful determinant of its perceived meaning.

Conclusion

Colantonio is a photographer possessed of a painter’s sensibility, spreading dramatic texture and tenderness throughout this image. There is visual rhyme and potentially reasoning in this photograph. The bells in Venice ring every fifteen minutes, for fifteen minutes, there’s never silence but this image emulates that there is.  Colantonio does not transfigure or transform this couple, she has captured them in plain sight. There may be tension of unspoken conversations or this may represent precious quiet moments of shared company. There is no expression of feeling of poetic awkwardness. We know that Colantonio is present and also manifestly absent from the field of the image, this is the view through her lens. We are viewing what she wants us to see, at the moment of exposure.  Colantonio shows us the true contours of this young couple’s relationship, the simple crushing human truth of a great picture representing simple humanity, isn’t that what we all need?

Colantonio has captured the essence of our assignment ‘Reflection’ perfectly. Our brief was that it could be interpreted both literally and figuratively and Colantonio has illustrated her understanding and deciphered our brief consummately. We have the reflection from the canal as well as the reflection in each of the character’s facial expressions. Ad Reinhart once quipped ’Sculpture is something you bump into when you back up to look at a painting”, extirpating that expression, I would say “Portraiture is something you sometimes bump into when you back up to look at street photography.

Read moreAssignment – Reflection – Result and First Essay with Rita Colantonio for our Upcoming Book ‘Away with Words’

Mobile Photography / Art New Year Resolutions 2019 From Artists Throughout The World

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We are delighted to publish our New Year Resolutions for 2019 from a selection of highly talented mobile photographers and artists throughout the world. As in previous years we have asked mobile photographers and artists for their New Year Resolutions with an accompanying image or video . Thank you to everyone who has contributed, they all make great reading, viewing and are inspiring, we are forever grateful to you all.

One of my New Year Resolutions this year is to accept an invitation to at least one Private View Exhibition each month. Naturally, I do not want to attend these on my own, so I am inviting our readers to contribute to each opportunity by supplying questions for the artist I am viewing. The first private view I will be attending this year, is in early February, with Tracey Emin, at her major solo exhibition entitled ‘A Fortnight of Tears’. I’ll be chatting with Emin there, so please forward any questions you would like me to ask her, on your behalf. Another of my New Year Resolutions is to try to give each individual artist more of my time. That’s no easy task but I believe so strongly in all of your work, I want to encourage and help as much as I can. So, to each and every one of you, I wish you a very Happy New Year, with much good health, wealth and success!

(Editors note: If you have not contributed to this post and you would like to, or if you have sent me your brief and I have not included it here, please let me know and I will open up this post and add it and of course you have my apologises in advance).

Many thank to the following artists for their contributions:

M. Cecilia Sao Thiago, Juta Jazz, Sabine Gromek, Jaime Glasser, Petyr Campos, Jean Hutter, Carol Wiebe, Robin Cohen, Stefania Pecchioli, Diane Neubauer, Clint Cline, Giulia Baita, David Hayes, Kerry Mitchell, Andrew B White, Rad Drew, Shirley Drevich, Armineh Hovanesian, Manuela Matos Monteiro, Fleur Schim, Barbara Braman, Oola Cristina, Carlos Austin, Susan Detroy, Bonobo Stone, Allyson Marie, Luis Rodriguez, Cecily Batey Caceu, Gizem Karayavus, Elodie Hunting, Anca Balaj, Christine Sobczak, Rino Rossi, Sonya Sanchez Arias, Gerry Coe, Jenny Pieters, Tricia Dewey, Margaret Waage, Paul Toussiant, Debara Splendorio, Rita Colantonio, Karen Klinedinst, Eliza Badoiu, Susan Rennie, Andrea Bigiarini, David Scott Leibowitz, Manuela Basaldella, Patricia Januszkiewciz, Gianluca Ricoveri, Deborah McMillion, Glenn Homann, Lanie Heller, Ioannis Sidiropoulos, Isabella Matthews, Sukru Mehmet Omur, Lisa Mitchell, Maurizio Zanetti, Meri Walker, Judy Wahlberg, Karen Axelrad, Jill Lian, Joyce Harkin, Jane Schultz, Catherine Caddigan, Peter Wilkin, Tuba Korhan, Diana Nicholette Jeon, Christina Chin, Elaine Taylor, Eduardo Llerandi, Cathrine Halsor, Rob Pearson-Wright, Clarisse Debout, Fiona Christian, Patricia Leeds, Michel Pretterklieber, Robi Gallardo.

Read moreMobile Photography / Art New Year Resolutions 2019 From Artists Throughout The World

Mobile Photography & Art – Flickr Group Showcase – 16 December 2018

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What is remarkable about your vision, as mobile artists, is that it remains intensely human rooted in common experience, replete with doubt, frustration but also conjoined with belief and certainity. Characteristics demonstrative of our obsession with this new medium. As your journey through this weeks showcase to the centre of the lyrical and artist narrative, your destination alludes to the ultimate climax and is swiftly tempered by the safety of its harbour. This showcase is at the frontier of the world of mobile photography and art. Enjoy!

Thank you to all artists for submitting your works. If you would like your work to be considered for entry in to our weekly Mobile Photography and Art Flickr Group, please submit it to our dedicated group, here.

Many congratulations to the following artists for being featured this week:

Robin Robertis, Alan Evans, Kristie Benoit, Jun Yamaguchi, Donald Williams, jon jon, Milly M, Candice Railton, Eduardo Llerandi, Linda Hollier, Gianluca Ricoveri, Donald Williams, Barbara Nebel, Deborah McMillion, before.1st.light – Jane Schultz, Sourav Das, BorisBSchulz2009, Clint Cline, Vadim Demjianov, Debara Splendorio, Enio Godoy, Catherine Caddigan, Liliana Schwitter, Jean Hutter, R K, Juta Jazz, XQME, Elsa Brenner, Mark Walton1, Hanni K, Kate Zari Roberts, Gina Costa, P. A. Hamel, 1968selin, Tomaso Belloni, zananiro, Buzz Kills, Jill Lian, Peter Wilkin, Lorenka Campos, Karen Axelrad, Barbara Braman, Damian De Souza, Tuba, Lrh Arquitecto – Luison, Rita Colantonio, TheiPhoneArtGirl – Meri Walker, Arko Rayhan, Dieuwke Geervliet, Poetic Medium.

Read moreMobile Photography & Art – Flickr Group Showcase – 16 December 2018

Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry ‘Each Year’ by Dora Malech with Rita Colantonio

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is entitled ‘Each Year’ by Dora Malech.  Malech is the author of Stet (Princeton University Press, 2018), Say So (Cleveland State University Poetry Center, 2011), and Shore Ordered Ocean (Waywiser Press, 2009). She is the recipient of a Writer’s Fellowship at the Civitella Ranieri Center, a Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellowship, and an Amy Clampitt Residency Award. She lives in Baltimore, where she is an assistant professor in The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University.

I have matched mobile art work entitled ‘Keepsake’ by @jules4921 – Rita Colantonio with this poem. You can view and follow her on Instagram here.

Source poets.org

If you would like to be featured in our Saturday Poetry section, please ensure you include the hashtag #theappwhisperer to any images posted to Instagram. This will mean we will be able to consider it.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

Read moreMobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry ‘Each Year’ by Dora Malech with Rita Colantonio

Mobile Art and Photography That Has Influenced Me – Interview with Rita Colantonio from Massachusetts, United States

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We are delighted to bring you the nineteenth in our brand new Mobile Art and Photography that has Influenced Me series of interviews at TheAppWhisperer. Within this series, we contact well established and highly regarded mobile photographers and artists and ask them a sequence of questions. Each one relates to mobile art and photography that has inveigled and continues to impact them, by other mobile artists throughout the world. Our nineteenth interview is with Rita Colantonio from Massachusetts, United States, enjoy!

In this interview, Colantonio cites work by: Catherine Caddigan, Cargan Brown, Saul Landell, Marc Chagall, Anca Balaj, Maggie Taylor, Lorenka Campos, Oola Cristina, Alexis Rotella, and Julie Denning.

To read others in this series please go here.

(foreword by Joanne Carter)

 

Read moreMobile Art and Photography That Has Influenced Me – Interview with Rita Colantonio from Massachusetts, United States

‘Wide Awoke’- Are Female Artists Worth Collecting? with Joyce Harkin from Scotland, UK

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This time in our latest ‘Wide Awoke’ article, with Joyce Harkin, we speak behind the video, have a listen…

Several weeks ago, we announced our brand new ‘Women’ section within TheAppWhisperer and we kicked off with our first ‘Talking Points’ with the incredibly talented mobile artist, M. Cecilia Sao Thiago,where she visually channeled the creative argument of ‘what if I wasn’t me?’, envisaging herself as an artist whilst physically being a male, as opposed to female.Catherine Caddigan another accomplised aritst also contributed with a great ‘Talking Points’ entitled ‘What do we reveal to the camera’. We followed that up with a fabuolus insightful video fromSusan Detroy,with her perspective vis-Ã-vis the women’s movement, using her own self portraiture work and ethos. Successively we published the first in our Women’s ‘Wide Awoke’ section with Armineh Hovanesian and followingwork from  Deborah McMillion, Lynette Sheppard, Rita Colantonio and Fleur Schim.

For our ‘Wide Awoke’ section initially, we selected a challenging discussion at the Tate Museum, London. Recently, an article was published in The Guardian, by Helen Gorrill, suggesting that female artists are less likely to succeed now, than they were in the 1990s. Gorrill expressed “Today, when men’s artwork is signed, it goes up in value; conversely when work by women is signed, it goes down in value, and the addition of a woman’s signature can devalue artwork to the extent that female artists are more likely to leave their work unsigned”. And even more scathingly, “The Tate seems to align to these views by only collecting a ‘token’ proportion of work by women, who form the 74% majority of fine art graduates”, Gorrill goes on to say.

This of course, provoked much discussion here at TheAppWhisperer HQ, after all, this is one of the key elements to our new Women section, we want to drag out all these issues and more into the open.

We approached several female mobile artists and asked them this question ‘Are Female Artists Worth Collecting?’ and asked them to create a short video of their answer to our subheading of this section ‘Wide Awoke’. Today, we are incredibly proud to publish the sixth in this series by none other than female artist, Joyce Harkin, from Scotland.

We really hope you enjoy this new section and of course, please feel free to leave comments below, this is a section about Womens issues but we invite all men to view and participate in commenting too.

©Joyce Harkin

Read more‘Wide Awoke’- Are Female Artists Worth Collecting? with Joyce Harkin from Scotland, UK

‘Wide Awoke’- Are Female Artists Worth Collecting? with Fleur Schim from Florida, United States

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Several weeks ago, we announced our brand new ‘Women’ section within TheAppWhisperer and we kicked off with our first ‘Talking Points’ with the incredibly talented mobile artist, M. Cecilia Sao Thiago, where she visually channeled the creative argument of ‘what if I wasn’t me?’, envisaging herself as an artist whilst physically being a male, as opposed to female. Catherine Caddigan another accomplised aritst also contributed with a great ‘Talking Points’ entitled ‘What do we reveal to the camera’. We followed that up with a fabuolus insightful video from Susan Detroy, with her perspective vis-Ã-vis the women’s movement, using her own self portraiture work and ethos. Successively we published the first in our Women’s ‘Wide Awoke’ section with Armineh Hovanesian and following work from  Deborah McMillion, Lynette Sheppard and Rita Colantonio.

For our ‘Wide Awoke’ section initially, we selected a challenging discussion at the Tate Museum, London. Recently, an article was published in The Guardian, by Helen Gorrill, suggesting that female artists are less likely to succeed now, than they were in the 1990s. Gorrill expressed “Today, when men’s artwork is signed, it goes up in value; conversely when work by women is signed, it goes down in value, and the addition of a woman’s signature can devalue artwork to the extent that female artists are more likely to leave their work unsigned”. And even more scathingly, “The Tate seems to align to these views by only collecting a ‘token’ proportion of work by women, who form the 74% majority of fine art graduates”, Gorrill goes on to say.

This of course, provoked much discussion here at TheAppWhisperer HQ, after all, this is one of the key elements to our new Women section, we want to drag out all these issues and more into the open.

We approached several female mobile artists and asked them this question ‘Are Female Artists Worth Collecting?’ and asked them to create a short video of their answer to our subheading of this section ‘Wide Awoke’. Today, we are incredibly proud to publish the fifth in this series by none other than female artist, Fleur Schim from the United States.

We really hope you enjoy this new section and of course, please feel free to leave comments below, this is a section about Womens issues but we invite all men to view and participate in commenting too.

Read more‘Wide Awoke’- Are Female Artists Worth Collecting? with Fleur Schim from Florida, United States

‘Wide Awoke’- Are Female Artists Worth Collecting? with Rita Colantonio from Cape Cod, United States

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Three weeks ago, we announced our brand new ‘Women’ section within TheAppWhisperer and we kicked off with our first ‘Talking Points’ with the incredibly talented mobile artist, M. Cecilia Sao Thiago, where she visually channeled the creative argument of ‘what if I wasn’t me?’, envisaging herself as an artist whilst physically being a male, as opposed to female. If you missed that, please go here. Following that we published the first in our Women’s ‘Wide Awoke’ section with Armineh Hovanesian (see here).Last week we published our second instalment to this series with Deborah McMillion(see here). Yesterday we published our third instalment to this series with Lynette Sheppard (see here).

For our ‘Wide Awoke’ section initially, we selected a challenging discussion at the Tate Museum, London. Recently, an article was published in The Guardian, by Helen Gorrill, suggesting that female artists are less likely to succeed now, than they were in the 1990s. Gorrill expressed “Today, when men’s artwork is signed, it goes up in value; conversely when work by women is signed, it goes down in value, and the addition of a woman’s signature can devalue artwork to the extent that female artists are more likely to leave their work unsigned”. And even more scathingly, “The Tate seems to align to these views by only collecting a ‘token’ proportion of work by women, who form the 74% majority of fine art graduates”, Gorrill goes on to say.

This of course, provoked much discussion here at TheAppWhisperer HQ, after all, this is one of the key elements to our new Women section, we want to drag out all these issues and more into the open.

We approached several female mobile artists and asked them this question ‘Are Female Artists Worth Collecting?’ and asked them to create a short video of their answer to our subheading of this section ‘Wide Awoke’. Today, we are incredibly proud to publish the fourth in this series by none other, than highly sought after female artist, Rita Colantonio from Cape Cod, United States.

We really hope you enjoy this new section and of course, please feel free to leave comments below, this is a section about Womens issues but we invite all men to view and participate in commenting too.

Read more‘Wide Awoke’- Are Female Artists Worth Collecting? with Rita Colantonio from Cape Cod, United States

Mobile Photography/Art Pic of the Day (876) via Instagram

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Here’s day eight hundred and seventy six of our mobile photography/art Pic of the Day section via Instagram. Each day we select one image a day for our Pic of the Day section on Instagram, with this hashtag #theappwhisperer.

To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag #theappwhisperer.

Today, we congratulate @jules4921- Rita Colantonio, with this wonderful image, entitled ‘Bits and Pieces’.

To view more of her work, please go here.

Read moreMobile Photography/Art Pic of the Day (876) via Instagram

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