Mobile Photography – Saturday Poetry – ‘The Answer’ by Sara Teasdale with @blurrybirdy

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is entitled ‘The Answer’ by Sara Teasdale. “Sara Teasdale received public admiration for her well-crafted lyrical poetry which centered on a woman’s changing perspectives on beauty, love, and death. Many of Teasdale’s poems chart developments in her own life, from her experiences as a sheltered young woman in St. Louis, to those as a successful yet increasingly uneasy writer in New York City, to a depressed and disillusioned person who would commit suicide in 1933. Although many later critics would not consider Teasdale a major poet, she was popular in her lifetime with both the public and critics. She won the first Columbia Poetry Prize in 1918, a prize that would later be renamed the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry“.

Source: Poetryfoundation.org

I have matched @blurrybirdy – Robin P’s image with this poem. You can view and follow her on Instagram here.

If you would like to be featured in our Saturday Poetry section, please ensure you include the hashtag #theappwhisperer to any images posted to Instagram. That will mean we will be able to consider it.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

[Also, don’t miss how to be included within our Artist Directory – here]

Read moreMobile Photography – Saturday Poetry – ‘The Answer’ by Sara Teasdale with @blurrybirdy

Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Nobody Told Me’

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is in some ways a dedication to the poet Hollie McNish. Essentially, when she became pregnant, she didn’t feel she was ready to be a mother, actually she felt ashamed and channelled her feelings, of parenthood, into verse. McNish’s poetry is not all about love and joy, it’s about pregnancy worries and traumas to all the concerns and pressures we feel post pregnancy too. With public breastfeeding in toilets, to trying to quieten down her baby whilst commuting to work on the train. With my own daughter now at thirteen years old, these type of issues are behind us and I am so enjoying sharing our time together, being together.

I took this mobile photograph of Bella as we spent the day at a beautiful English country estate.

Here is an excerpt of Hollie McNish’s book – ‘Nobody Told Me’ – a book you might want to read if you really do need to know the in’s and out’s of it all… (I am grateful those days have passed).

To view the others we have published in this series, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

Read moreMobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Nobody Told Me’

Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – St Rose of Lima’s Revenge by Geraldine Clarkson

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is a poem entitled ‘St Rose of Lima’s Revenge’ by Geraldine Clarkson. This poem was commended in the 2015 National Poetry Competition.

Geraldine Clarkson is the winner of the Anne Born Prize 2015. In 2015 she also won the Poetry London Competition, Magma Editors’ Prize and the 2015 Ver Prize. She was included in The Best British Poetry 2014 (Salt) and she was ‘Selected Poet’ in Magma 58. She has two poems in This Line is Not for Turning: An Anthology of Contemporary British Prose Poetry (Cinnamon Press). She was a Writers’ Centre Norwich Escalator winner in 2011 and she was shortlisted in the Arvon International Poetry Competition in 2010. A selection of her poems were included in Primers (Nine Arches Press, in conjunction with the Poetry School) in April 2016, and her first pamphlet is forthcoming in the Laureate’s Choice series (Smith/Doorstop).

Source: Poems.ThePoetrySociety

I have matched @cokejube‘s – Corinna from Germany, image with this poem. You can follow her on Instagram here.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

 

Read moreMobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – St Rose of Lima’s Revenge by Geraldine Clarkson

Mobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Having a Coke with You’ by Frank O’Hara

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As it is Valentine’s weekend we thought it would be prudent to bring you this romantically beautiful poem. In his book, The Last Avant-Garde: The Making of the New York School of Poets, David Lehman correctly comments about O’Hara’s poetry: “The surface of O’Hara’s poems is so dazzling, with taste so fine and sensibility so rare and appealing, that it comes as a surprise to investigate and realize that there are depths of meaning in his offhanded poems that seem as disarmingly immediate and perishable as telephone calls. The prejudice against humor and lightheartedness in poetry has caused some readers to overlook not only the lyric pathos informing O’Hara’s work but also the incisive way his work captures a world, a time, and a place.”

“Having a Coke with You,” was first published in a small press magazine called Love. O’Hara wrote the poem four days after returning to New York City from a business trip in Spain on April 21, 1960. “Having a Coke with You” is one of many love poems that O’Hara composed during his love affair with Vincent Warren, a dancer with whom O’Hara was madly in love. “Having a Coke with You” expresses O’Hara’s idea that poems can be as direct and personal as telephone conversations. It describes the affection O’Hara felt for Warren. By listing the details of his love for Warren, then comparing them to his own activities in Spain, and great works of Western art, O’Hara compares art to the real experience of a lover’s company and beauty. O’Hara was an associate curator for the Museum of Modern Art in New York and while in Spain, organised a show called “New Spanish Painting and Sculpture.” References to paintings and sculpture, such as Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and Marino Marini’s Horse and Rider, suggests that the artists were not necessarily in love with their subjects. Throughout the poem O’Hara juxtaposes life and art. Life, in O’Hara’s interpretation is always the better of the two; it is dynamic and unmediated.

The poem is short, written in long, largely unpunctuated lines, giving it a breathless quality. His use of repetition, detail, and imagery give the poem a cartoonish and hallucinatory sensation.

To make this weeks Saturday Poetry even more special we have included an incredibly rare reading of this poem by Frank O’Hara himself. This reading was filmed in 1966, just before his accidental death in the same year.

Source: The Poetic Quotidian

I hope you enjoy this poem, I have matched @BreadGeekJeffrey Simpson’s image ‘Sculpted Love with this poem. You can follow him on Instagram here.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here. To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

 

HAVING A COKE WITH YOU

is even more fun than going to San Sebastian, Irún, Hendaye, Biarritz, Bayonne

or being sick to my stomach on the Travesera de Gracia in Barcelona

partly because in your orange shirt you look like a better happier St. Sebastian

partly because of my love for you, partly because of your love for yoghurt

partly because of the fluorescent orange tulips around the birches

partly because of the secrecy our smiles take on before people and statuary

it is hard to believe when I’m with you that there can be anything as still

as solemn as unpleasantly definitive as statuary when right in front of it

in the warm New York 4 o’clock light we are drifting back and forth

between each other like a tree breathing through its spectacles

 

and the portrait show seems to have no faces in it at all, just paint

you suddenly wonder why in the world anyone ever did them

 

I look

at you and I would rather look at you than all the portraits in the world

except possibly for the Polish Rider occasionally and anyway it’s in the Frick

which thank heavens you haven’t gone to yet so we can go together the first time

and the fact that you move so beautifully more or less takes care of Futurism

just as at home I never think of the Nude Descending a Staircase or

at a rehearsal a single drawing of Leonardo or Michelangelo that used to wow me

and what good does all the research of the Impressionists do them

when they never got the right person to stand near the tree when the sun sank

or for that matter Marino Marini when he didn’t pick the rider as carefully

as the horse

 

it seems they were all cheated of some marvellous experience

which is not going to go wasted on me which is why I am telling you about it

—Frank O’Hara

 

Read moreMobile Photography / Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Having a Coke with You’ by Frank O’Hara

Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘A Childhood’ by Robin Robertson

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is a poem entitled ‘A Childhood’ by Robin Robertson.  I hope you enjoy this poem, I have matched centerforbalancecliff with this image.

Source: The New Yorker

 To view the others in our Mobile Photography/Art Saturday Poetry section, please go here.

To ensure your image receives our attention, please upload it to Instagram with this hashtag – #theappwhisperer

Read moreMobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘A Childhood’ by Robin Robertson

Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Ample Make This Bed’ by Emily Dickinson

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This weeks Saturday Poetry, matched with mobile photography/art is a poem entitled ‘Ample Make This Bed’ by Emily Dickinson. This poem, it is said has two meanings, one that the poet is speaking about a sensual moment that she is intending to spend with her companion, or fantasising about it and the other notion, is that she is preparing her deathbed. In as much as she is trying to ensure that when the time comes, everything is perfect.

Source: Poem Hunter

For me, I align myself with the former, not least because several weeks ago, Kevin and I ordered a new bed and we are very excited about it being delivered next Tuesday. It has been handmade and is the most luxurious bed you can buy in England. It’s vast, far larger than our current bed and we have purchased the most delicious very high thread count new sheets. So, Christmas for us, will be spent in this entire location (we hope).

I hope you enjoy this poem, I have matched Trishg61’s ‘What you don’t know, you don’t miss’ image with this poetry. The poet has used the punctuation marks for channelizing the flow of the poem. Dickinson has also broken the sentences in such a way, that the readers would understand the flow of the expressions better. The poet has stopped at points, where she wanted to capture a frame of expression.

Ample make this bed.

Make this bed with awe;

In it wait till judgment break

Excellent and fair.

Be its mattress straight,

Be its pillow round;

Let no sunrise’ yellow noise

Interrupt this ground”.

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

Read moreMobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Ample Make This Bed’ by Emily Dickinson

Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Silt Whisper’ by Ailbhe Darcy

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

This week’s poem, Silt Whisper is by Ailbhe Darcy, it is from her book Imaginary Menagerie.

“One-Eyed Jack is an American board game, played with cards and poker chips It’s the two-eyed Jacks (clubs or diamonds) that are the official wild cards. Silt Whisper begins with a signal that breaking and making rules could be significant in the poem. Hearts and spades are the official one-eyed jacks, and we all know what they symbolise. If it’s a couple playing the game, the invention of their own rules would be a shared joke, and mark a developing intimacy”. 

To view the others we have published in this section, go here.

 

Silt Whisper

 

That summer one-eyed jacks were wild:

we learned new rules, left tea to brew.

Smoke stilled air. Leaves lay unturned.

Unemployment was another high.

I had been a storm in a polystyrene cup,

seeking scald, steam, instance, but now

We drew up lists; mapped out desire lines; skipped

interviews to collect blooms; paused before flight.

The only record of that time the silt of prophecy,

the memory of weight in our cupped hands.

For a short while we held the one breath:

I could never set it down.

Read moreMobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘Silt Whisper’ by Ailbhe Darcy

Mobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘The Moon and The Yew Tree’ by Sylvia Plath

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I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem and I will also try to link a mobile photography image, that has been uploaded to our Instagram hashtag #theappwhisperer during the week.

As it is Halloween weekend my thoughts turned to the Yew Tree (Taxus baccata), also known as ‘the tree of the dead’. It is commonly found in churchyards throughout the United Kingdom, France and Spain. Some, it has been said have stood for between 1,300 and 3,000 years. At least 250 yews today are as old or older than the churchyards in which they stand.

It is “beneath the yew-tree’s shade” that “heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap,” as Thomas Gray’s “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” puts it. Taxus baccata almost invariably casts its shadow where the dead are, on the south and west sides of the church. Like the bodies it watches over, it is rarely found on the north side, and then only in exceptional circumstances.

I thought it would be appropriate to republish Sylvia Plath’s ‘The Moon and The Yew Tree’ poem today. In many ways this poem, pointedly the verse describing the yew tree, leaves us with an ominous feeling, almost a form of foreboding. She almost describes it or perhaps it’s deliberate as a phallic shape, a symbol of maleness.

Surprisingly for Halloween there’s an absence of churchyard, yew and even moon images uploaded to our Instagram group. In view of this, I have selected @sm2azimi’s image below to match with this poem. Although not featuring yew trees, I feel it captures some of the other elements of this poem.

Read moreMobile Photography/Art – Saturday Poetry – ‘The Moon and The Yew Tree’ by Sylvia Plath

Saturday Poetry

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I love poetry, I love words, pictures, music, people and the combination of these is the utmost thrill to me.

I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem from a new and wonderful book, with a link if you wish to purchase the entire thing. Just a little something extra to enjoy the weekend. Last weekend I published a poem by Andrew McMillian – Jacob with the Angel, from his book Physical. Raw and urgent, these poems are hymns to the male body – to male friendship and male love – muscular, sometimes shocking, but always deeply moving, here’s a link to that.

This week I am publishing a poem called ‘Silentium’ by Fyodor Tyutchev and translated by Robert Chandler. It is from The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry, see here.

Source: AllPoetry.com

Read moreSaturday Poetry

Saturday Poetry

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I love poetry, I love words, pictures, music, people and the combination of these is the utmost thrill to me.

I am introducing a new section, simply titled, Saturday Poetry. Each Saturday I will publish a poem from a new and wonderful book, with a link if you wish to purchase the entire thing. Just a little something extra to enjoy the weekend.

Today, I am publishing a poem by Andrew McMillian – Jacob with the Angel, from his book Physical. Raw and urgent, these poems are hymns to the male body – to male friendship and male love – muscular, sometimes shocking, but always deeply moving. We are witness here to an almost religious celebration of the flesh: a flesh vital with the vulnerability of love and loss, to desire and its departure. In an extraordinary blend of McMillan’s own colloquial Yorkshire rhythms with a sinewy, Metaphysical music and Thom Gunn’s torque and speed – ‘your kiss was deep enough to stand in’ – the poems in this first collection confront what it is to be a man and interrogate the very idea of masculinity. This is poetry where every instance of human connection, from the casual encounter to the intimate relationship, becomes redeemable and revelatory.

Source: KimMorePoet

Kindle edition $7.28/£4.68/download

Read moreSaturday Poetry

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