Top Five Photo Apps – Photo App Lounge – By Em Kachouro

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Welcome to our Top Five Photo Apps – Photo App Lounge section of theappwhisperer.com. This is an area on our site where we ask highly accomplished mobile photographers what their top five photo apps are and why.

We recently published the Top Five Photo Apps as recommended by Yannick Brice , Cedric Blanchon, Irene Sneddon, our Columnist and Award Winning Mobile Artist Sarah Jarrett as well as Louise Fryer, Lisa Waddell, Davide Capponi, Ali Jardine, Clint Cline, Elaina Wilcox, France Freeman, Tess Gomm, Lola Mitchell and Vivi’s Top Five Photo Apps including accompanying images demonstrating these selections, if you missed those, please go here.

Today, we are featuring Em Kachouro, we have Kachouro in many of our Flickr Group showcases and we’re delighted today to publish this wonderful article today.

Number One— Procreate

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©Em Kachouro – Snapseed, Procreate

 

My first app that I ever bought for my iPad was Procreate — and it’s still my favourite one. It’s not an app for editing photos like e.g. Snapseed, my Number Two app. Procreate is an app made for sketching, painting, creating . But, of course, you can import a photo and modify it via those sketch and paint tools. But Procreate offers a lot of more: You can work with layers and merge them in a variety of ways (e.g. multiply, linear burn, color dodge). As I come from Photoshop world, I felt very familiar with those possibilities – but Procreate is a lot easier to learn and use.

When I like to quickly merge to pictures, I use Image Blender. But when I like to apply some paint and sketch effects between layers, I prefer Procreate.

The above picture is my first one I ever made with Procreate. It took me 20 minutes; the source is a photo I took with my iPad in Ada/Tuscany (Italy).

You can use Procreate even without importing photos. The following picture was painted completely on Procreate and was processed afterwards with some photo apps as it were a photo.

Number Two – Snapseed

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©Em Kachouro – Source photo

 

Snapseed is my basic tool I use for nearly every photo before processing it with other apps. I tried out a variety of apps for tuning and adjusting, but I always come back to Snapseed. Just for grunge effects I prefer other apps. Snapseed offers some random buttons for specific tools.

Sometimes I’d like to have some random proposals for a whole set of effects to get some unexpected results you can work with– and in this case I first use Snapseed and then e.g. Phototoaster.

I processed the photo of the little model car in the first steps with Snapseed before it went into further processing steps with other apps (Image Blender, Color Lake).

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©Em Kachouro – Snapseed, Image Blender, Color Lake, Repix

Number Three – ToonCamera

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©Em Kachouro – ToonCamera, Procreate, Snapseed

 

For converting photos into cartoons and pencil art, I can recommend ToonCamera. It doesn’t work for all subjects and often the effect is too exaggerated. You have to find out, play around, experiment. In the following photo of a hairdressing salon it worked fine. The picture was first processed with ToonCamera. Then I wrote the text in Procreate and mirrored it – and finally the picture got its specific atmosphere via Snapseed.

Number Four — Vintage Scene HD

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©Em Kachouro – Snapseed, Vintage Scene HD, Image Blender

 

 

My favorite vintage app is currently Vintage Scene HD. It offers you a lot of presets and also a random button. Some effects remind me on really old newspaper pictures. The following pictures show this vintage newspaper style.

Number Five – Color Lake

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©Em Kachouro – Snapseed, Vintage Scene HD, Alien Sky

 

I also like to mention in this list an app with one special feature: With Color Lake you can add and modify water reflections to your picture. I also used it in my picture with the little black model car you can see above. I always use Color Lake as one of a multitude of tools – but for water reflections it’s perfect and easy to use.

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