Mobile Photography / Art New Year Resolutions 2017 From Around The World

Share

When we think of a new year, we sometimes think of a fresh start and with that, our minds start racing with ways to improve on what we did last year. Sometimes, New Year Resolutions are ambitious, sometimes less so … Read more

Mobile Photography / Art New Year Resolutions 2016 From Around The World

Share

New Year Resolutions have a long history, the Babylonians pledged to return borrowed objects and repay their debts at the start of each year, while the Romans kicked off January by making a vow to the god Janus (from whom the month takes its name).

As we have been repeating and updating this featured article now for several years, many artists have looked back and lamented at their broken promises but also as you read, you will see that many rejoice at the acomplishments that they have achieved.

In assessing my goals for the New Year, I don’t list tasks, I analyze the optimal approaches in reaching those goals, breaking them down into steps. I think we need to challenge ourselves – to stretch, purposefully, beyond our comfort zones. I make a plan, which includes a roadmap to consciously pursuing new ideas, and discovering possibilities. Each step forward, into unknown territory, emboldens us.

In 2015, I have watched us all grow, creatively, exponentially, in part because we build on a collective intelligence. Having a context, and a community, helps us know ourselves, better.

I’m excited to think of what you each will bring to this New Year. We have shared great energy, camaraderie, encouragement, information, and imagery. We have connected, mourned each other’s losses, and celebrated our victories, large and small, together.

Many thanks to our international community, to all those who have submitted artwork to TheAppWhisperer project, commented on articles, and spread the word about mobile artistry. Thank you to the extraordinary group of features editors who volunteer their efforts and expertise to make TheAppWhisperer a rich and diverse resource. As always, I am grateful for your friendship and support. You move me.

I would like to thank all the artists who have participated our New Years Resolution project this year. Everyone enjoys reading and learning more about you all and it’s a wonderful opportunity to share and rejoice in all your achievements and of course, to bathe in your glorious art.

Thank you, Allyson Marie, Andrea Brigiarini, Sylvia DeVoss, Marian Rubin, Marguerite Khoury, Alejandro Cendan Rodriguez, Illse Harris, Gianluca Ricoveri, Giulia Baita, Jaime Glasser, Albion Harrison-Naish, Maria Thiago, Ile Mont, Wanphen Sangkamee, Brendan O Se, Teri Lou Dantzler, Gizem Karayavuz, Maria Flourou, Bonobo Stone, Dani Salvadori, Jay Desind, Louise Whiting, Lee Atwell, Ale De Gangi, Jill Lian, Patricia Januszkiewicz, Carolyn Hall Young, Kerryn Benbow, Petyr Campos, Robi Gallardo, Kate Zari Roberts, Lisa Waddell, Deborah McMillion, Cindy Buske, Eliza Badoiu, Susan Tuttle, Ioannis Sidiropoulos, Michel Pretterklieber, Cheryl A Townsend, Elaina Wilcox, Michelle Robinson, Fiona Christian, Andrew Proudlove, Matthew Kayden, Candice Railton, Paul Brown, Brett Chenoweth, Meri Walker, Janine Graf, Ocean Morisset, Amy Leibrand, Karen Divine, Leinaala Mitchell Art, Jane Schultz,  Andrew B White, Juta Jazz, Robin Sacknoff, Vanessa Vox, Yulia Naganova, Alix Carmichele, Jim Perdue, Yoni Mayeri, Tommy Vee, Angie Lambert, Martin Durr, Riel Noir, Cecily Caceu, Ed Kriner, Cathrine Halsor, Dilshad Corleone, Diana Nicholette Jeon, Rad Drew, Rob Pearson-Wright, Gina Costa, Marianne Rieter, Gillia Brodie, Karen Axelrad, Christine O Sobczak, Mariette Schrijver, Claude Panneton, Lanie Heller, Bobbi McMurry, Tania Konnerth, Constance Rosethnal, Tina Rice,  Lrh Arquitecto​, Paula Broom​ Carlos Austin​ Armineh Hovanesian​ Hovanesian, Yoni Mayeri​, Ginger Lucero​, Mandolina Moon​, Jennifer A Thomas​, Jackson Mah​, Shirley Drevich​, Erika C. Brothers​, Lorenka Campos​, Isabella Matthews​, Bonny Breddels​, Maurizio Zanetti​, Keisuke Takahashi​, Mehmet Omur, Elsa Brenner​ and Jo Jo​.

Read more

Mobile Photography Exhibition by Alix Carmichele

Share

Alix Carmichele is a mobile photographer from South Africa, she studied Photography in London, UK and thus began the long process of establishing herself in this field, polishing & refining her technique by learning all the tricks of the trade from various experienced professionals. Extensive travel throughout Africa and many other exotic locations in the world has further inspired and imbued her work with a unique quality. With a seemingly effortless gift for composition, she manages to entice the viewer into a direct experience with her subject matter. Much of her work is created digitally and her long experience with practical darkroom theory is applied to enhance this new media. She also makes use of square format manual cameras.

Carmichele has a wonderful exhibition opening on 9 October 2015, at The Tin House – 1730 hrs – she would love to welcome you, if you are in the area.

I asked Carmichele to explain, in her own words, what this exhibition is all about, please enjoy this read:

“The use of the character as a tool to represent a basic story line and to express a natural progression of the elements in this case a solitary image using various weapons and props which represent the elements from different cultures, as well as a few new ones, shot on iPad4 using Hipstamatic’s Lowy blanko film and lens combination and editing in Photoshop gives the impression of graphic novel or anime. Although not fully stylised as a drawing the image still maintains a photographic integrity however the image could go either way… 5% to the left a photograph or 5% to the right a graphic drawing.

My Inspiration: I love the interconnections between Zen Buddhism and popular culture, notably anime, an animation style which originated in Japan. It is characterised by distinctive characters and backgrounds (hand-drawn or computer-generated) that visually and thematically set it apart from other forms of animation; and or Manga, which is Japanese for “comics” or “whimsical images”. Manga developed from a mixture of ukiyo-e and Western styles of drawing, and took its current form shortly after World War II. Anime and manga share many characteristics, including: exaggerating (in terms of scale) of physical features, to which the reader presumably should pay most attention (best known being “large eyes”), “dramatically shaped speech bubbles, speed lines and onomatopoeic, exclamatory typography

In anime, there are a lot of powerful characters who have unique special abilities’, so I decided to try and interpret the elements through my camera using an autonomous and independent warrior character to explore this theme. For my own purposes I’ve used an umbrella, a Katana (Japanese sword); a whip; an old muscat; a stick, cards, powder, a bow and fire so giving my warrior character the space to play with and create new interpretations of the elements through the freedom of artistic and theatrical expression. Photographing my warrior in mid air is my way of showing the exaggeration of Manga and I’m hoping that I have achieved a sense of drama and magic in this action without the use of speech bubbles and exclamatory script!

Earth, air, fire, and water: these four elements, in the Western tradition, are the foundation of natural magic, alchemy, philosophy, modern science, and life itself. “Life is the fire that burns and the sun that gives light,” said the Roman philosopher Seneca the Younger. “Life is the wind and the rain and the thunder in the sky. Life is matter and is earth, what is and what is not, and what beyond is in Eternity.”

Read more

Mobile Movies – The Making of a Romantic Silver Bracelet by Alix Carmichele

Share

I am delighted to publish this wonderful mobile movie with accompanying story and technique by Alix Carmichele, she has created a film that encompasses a range of skills. From the actual creation process of the film itself, to the editing and music and of course to the actual development of the silver bracelet. It’s quite a wonder. I asked Carmichele to tell me more, you will enjoy this:

The object of making this little movie was to see whether I could use the time lapse or stop motion process to show the intricacies of making a beautiful piece of jewellery and come up with an understandable visual experience. The Hipstamatic combination of John S + the D type plate seemed to lend itself to the romanticism of the the actual concept of firing silver and melding it into something unique and desirable.

The time it took to shoot allowed me to see and come into close contact with a jeweller honing her craft and I wanted to share this experience with whomever I could, it’s almost a voyeuristic view of the creative process.

Technical: Hipstamatic John S + D type plate and over 1500 frames shot and put together in Time-Lapse app, then exported and edited in the Splice app. Music and other sound devices were added and there is a subliminal thread of words that I hope binds the entire process. The actual bracelet could be made in a week, but because it was a collaborative effort to show its inception to its final birth, the whole project took a period of 5 months to film.

The object of making this little movie was to see wether I could use the time lapse or stop motion process to show the intricacies of making a beautiful piece of jewellery and come up with an understandable visual experience. The Hipstamatic combination of John S + the D type plate seemed to lend itself to the romanticism of the the actual concept of firing silver and melding it into something unique and desirable.

The time it took to shoot allowed me to see and come into close contact with a jeweller honing her craft and I wanted to share this experience with whomever I could, it’s almost a voyeuristic view of the creative process..”

Read more

error: Content is protected !!
Skip to toolbar